Beginners Guide to Buying Sea Fishing Gear…

FLOAT FISHING

A great fishing method for harbour walls, piers and rocky headlands

Sample Species to target using Float Fishing

BLACK BREAM
GARFISH
GILTHEAD BREAM
GOLDEN GREY MULLET
POLLOCK
RED SEA BREAM
THICK LIPPED GREY MULLET
TRIGGER FISH
WRASSE

Please click on species for lots more information

Float fishing is both relaxing and exciting!  As with bottom fishing, a weight is attached to the line and then bait is put on to the hook.  The difference is that a float is placed inline to hold the hook where ever  you would like it to be in the water rather than letting it drop to the bottom.  The benefit of this is that you can target species that swim in mid waters.

Please click on the fish species to for help on locating where you will find them.

Once you have cast out,  it’s a waiting game until you see the float disappear and then the excitement begins!

float-rig

Float Fishing Rigs

We have illustrated a basic rig known as a sliding float rig.  By moving the stop knot, you can adjust the depth of the hook in order to target different species.   More information on this rig and lots more can be found in the pocket guide ‘Go Sea Angling’ by Mario Massimino

Float Fishing Tackle Pack

We have created this starter pack which provides all the tackle you need to have a go at float fishing.

Hooks
Floats
Beads
Swivels
Weights
Universal Line

Which Bait?

Click on the fish species above for more information  on our recommended bait for your target species.

Peeler Crabs

Also called soft crabs, peeler crabs are the crabs that have just lost their shells and they make excellent bait for all types of fish. These crabs will hide while they are waiting for their shells to harden so the best place to find them is under rocks at the low water mark in estuaries such as Falmouth, Helford or the Camel.

Frozen Sand Eel

Frozen rather than fresh sand eel is better as the scent trail improves with frozen eel. This is readily available in tackle shops.

Drop Nets

If you are fishing from a harbour or pier try using a drop net to catch some bait. This provides excellent results as the small crab, prawns etc that you catch in the net will be the same food that is attracting the fish to the wall in the first place.

To use a drop net, simply put some bait in the net (this can be, for example, scraps of mackerel). Then lower the net into the water until it is just above the bottom and then wait for 10-15 minutes before bringing it back to the surface.

Worms

The most common worms around Cornwall are lugworms although you can also get other varieties including ragworms. You can dig for worms at any time of the year. At low tide look on the sand for signs of worms as shown below and then dig between the squiggles and the hole and you will find the worm.

wormsand                     wormsand

Please do take note of any signs before you dig for bait as not all places allow digging.